From June 12-13, 2011, the IGLP,  along with the Harvard Program on International Legal Studies, the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard, the Sciences Po Law School and the HLS Program on Law and Social Thought, hosted a conference on “Franco-American Legal Influence, Then and Now,” at Harvard Law School.

This day-long conference explored historical and contemporary moments of intellectual influence and reception between French and US legal thought.  Participants examined the influence of the French pre World War I juristes inquiets (Geny, Salleiles and others) on the American social jurists (Pound, Cardozo, Brandeis) and the legal realists; the role of “French Theory” in changing the course of Critical Legal Studies in the US in the latter half of the twentieth century; and the impact of American legal theory on French legal theory movements and education today. We will ask several questions throughout: When have influence and reception been possible, under what political and intellectual conditions, and with what degree of desire, resistance, or reciprocity? What interdisciplinary formations have been suggested by various waves of influence; when has social science, and when have the human sciences, emerged as law’s interdisciplinary dancing partner? What caused waves of influence, and their interdisciplinary desires, to subside and die out? The program will conclude with a roundtable on contemporary possibilities for transatlantic legal study.

Click HERE to see the Conference Program