Travel Grants

The Institute for Global Law and Policy provides modest research and travel support to scholars conducting research in areas closely related to the IGLP’s ongoing work. Applications are open to current Harvard Law School students and alumni of IGLP: The Workshop. Preference is given to current doctoral students. Travel grants are limited to students who have been invited to present their scholarly work at academic conferences.

Travel grants are not available to students who have received other funding for the same trip. Generally, IGLP support does not exceed $500 toward the cost of travel for conferences in the US and $1,000 for conferences outside the US.

Applicants should include:

  • Current C.V.
  • HLS transcript
  • description of ongoing academic work
  • a budget
  • a copy of the invitation letter or email  from conference organizers  where you have presented

Click HERE to apply  for a Travel Grant!

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis.

2014-2015 Travel Grants:

In June 2014 we were pleased to welcome recipients of Doha-Santander Collaborative Travel Grants to Cambridge. These grants were available to groups of our IGLP Workshop alumni who applied to come to IGLP in June to deepen the discussions they began together at the IGLP Workshop in Doha in the hope that it may lead to a collaborative research project. Each team used their time together at the IGLP to continue their discussions and explore the potential to further develop their ideas about potential future projects. The 2014 Doha-Santander Collaborative Travel Grants were made by possible with the generous support of Santander Universities.

 

Critical Global Economic Governance

Team Leader: Camila Villard Duran (Brazil) University of São Paulo; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Gaye Gungor (Turkey) Gediz University; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant

Team members: Miguel Adame Martinez (Spain) Universidad de Sevilla; 2010 & 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Siobhan Airey (Ireland) University of Ottawa; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Rifat Azam (Israel) Radzyner School of Law; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Rui Guo China) Harvard Law School’ 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Y-Vonne Hutchison (United States) La Isla Foundation; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Enrique Prieto Rios (Colombia) Birkbeck School of Law, University of London; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Seyed Mohamad Hassan Razavi (Iran) McGill University; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Maja Savevska (Macedonia), Université Libre de Bruxelles Department of Political Science; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Gaye Gungor (Turkey) Gediz University; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant.

Description: This group aims to develop new thinking about global macroeconomic coordination and to explore governance models that might produce macroeconomic reforms that benefit citizens in a time of global economic transition. Group members aim to explore the emerging economic order in ways that may promote the human face of capital and improve understanding of the root causes of the on-going crisis and its spillover effects throughout the developing world. The group, which began discussions at the Doha Workshop, includes perspectives from outside the G8: Australia, Iran, Ireland, Columbia, China, UK, Spain, Finland, Israel, Macedonia, Turkey, Brazil and Nicaragua. Their goal is to highlight and encourage academic and policy voices from outside the G8 to develop a collection of essays on critical economic governance. Topics and papers to be discussed include:

  • Susan Harris Rimmer (with Professor Thomas Pogge) (Australia): “Illicit financial flows and the G20 – is increased transparency the answer?’”
  • Rifat Azam (Israel): ‘Innovations in International Taxation & in Financing Global Public Goods”
  • Mika Viljanen (Finland): “Glocal strategies – banking regulatory milieu after the fraught global consensus”
  • Camila Villard Duran (Brazil); “A socio-legal perspective on the IMF’s institutional design”
  • Miguel A. Adame-Martínez (Spain): “IMF, private law and sovereign debt restructuring”
  • Yvonne Hutchinson (Nicaragua/USA): “Multilateral private lending institutions and social due diligence: ensuring accountability”
  • Enrique Prieto Rios (Colombia): “International Investment Law: A clear agenda?”
  • Hassan Razavi (Iran): “The interaction between multilateral initiatives and non-multilateral, regional and bilateral responses to the issues related to international trade”
  • Siobhan Airey (Ireland): “The role of international law in shaping models of development proposed for the Global South: the Cotonou Partnership Agreement”
  • Maja Savevska (Macedonia): “Self-regulation in the EU: A Neo-Polanyian Approach”

 

(Dis)solving Informal Labor Vulnerability through Labor Laws: Examining the Failures, Frames and Assumptions

Team Leader: Yugank Goyal (India) University of Hamburg; 2012 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent

Team Members: Jorge Esquirol (United States) Florida International University College of Law; IGLP Workshop Core Faculty 2010-2014; Vivek Kanwar (United States) Jindal Global Law School; 2011 & 2012 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent; Kerry Rittich (Canada) University of Toronto, IGLP Workshop Core Faculty 2010-2014; Alvaro Santos (Mexico) Georgetown Law, IGLP Workshop Core Faculty 2010-2012 & 2014.

Description: This group of IGLP alumni and faculty aims to brainstorm together about the difficulty labor law traditions have had responding to increasing informality and labor vulnerability in developing nations, asking whether these difficulties are symptomatic of problems in labor law architecture or are simply a problem of their implementation. They will explore the roots of labor law’s exclusions in the history.

 

History, Anthropology, and the Archive in International Law

Team Leader: Rose Parfitt (United Kingdom) Melbourne University Law School; 2010 & 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, IGLP Docent 2012-2014

Team Members: Madelaine Chiam (Australia) Melbourne Law School; 2013 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent; Luis Eslava (Australia) Melbourne University Law School; 2010 & 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, IGLP Docent 2012-2014; Genevieve Painter (Ireland) University of California, Berkeley Law; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Charlotte Peevers (United Kingdom) University of Technology Sydney; 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2013 IGLP Docent

Description: This group will build on a conversation begun in Doha about historical and anthropological methods, the archive, and the temporality of international law. This relationship is already being analysed in the domestic or national context. We aim to transpose this conversation to the international plane – not least because the rise of modern international law is (continually) being heralded by declarations about time, while international law’s practices rest on the construction of its own archive. One substantive lens through which we intend to explore this relationship is the First World War – an event whose portentous and yet largely forgotten intricacies have been rendered largely invisible by the tendency of international lawyers to treat it as no more than a hinge between the ‘imperial’ and the ‘modern.’

 

Law’s Hegemony

Team Leader: Honor Brabazon (Canada), University of Oxford; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant

Team Members: Gleider Hernandez (Canada) University of Durham Law School; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Tor Krever (Canada) London School of Economics and Political Science; 2012 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2013 & 2014 IGLP Docent; Mai Taha (Egypt) University of Toronto; 2010 & 2011 Workshop Participant.

Description: A sign on a metropolitan parkway warns motorists not to drink and drive not because it is dangerous, costly, or immoral, but because it is illegal. Intrigued by a variety of similar instances found in daily life, political discourse, and academic debate, this project aims to explore the authority law commands over alternative systems through which to view, judge, and order our world. The group hopes to push beyond existing analyses of law’s authority coming from the perspective of analytical positivism (e.g. Raz, Hart and Dworkin). Instead, employing a Gramscian conception of hegemony, group members aim to consider the extent to which law can be understood as hegemonic; that is, how its supremacy over other systems of authority, morality, and social organization is considered to be common sense, beneficial, and universal. It seeks to understand why, in what ways, and to what ends law has obtained such significance. The group hopes their discussion will lead to a co-authored book project.

 

Multinational Behavior in Africa: Human Rights Perspectives

Team Leader: Qingxiu Bu (People’s Republic of China) University of Sussex; 2013 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent

Team Members: Luwam Dirar (Eritrea) Cornell Law School; 2012 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2013 IGLP Docent; Kibrom Teweldebirhan (Eritrea) Harvard Law School

Description: This team will explore the tensions in the human rights practices of Africa promoted and followed by multinational companies with a global presence, the international human rights community, and China’s approach to ensuring human rights in Africa. The group will explore whether a comprehensive framework of hard law and soft law initiatives, along with other incentives, may be more promising than any of these in isolation.

 

Operation CIA: Critical Interdisciplinary Approaches

Team Members: Swethaa Ballakrishnen (India) Stanford University; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Y-Vonne Hutchison (United States) La Isla Foundation; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant

Description: This group aims to explore interdisciplinary methods and encourage innovative forms of scholarly expression. Group members intend to discuss a series of classic challenges for interdisciplinary inquiry in the context of their own effort to articulate perspectives from the global periphery. They will focus discussion on three initial issues: how language privileges and affects relationships between and within disciplinary fields, the limits and reach of heterodoxy across disciplines, and the potential for clear articulation beyond the boundaries of a discipline. They intend to explore how they might practically equip themselves so that their research will speak to their disciplines as well as beyond them. The long-term goal of the project is to develop a workshop space for the presentation and exploration of socio-legal empirical data. They plan to use the initial meeting at Harvard to begin planning and to explore these ideas in more depth.

 

Reviving Comparative Law as a Heterodox Discipline

Team Leader: Amaya Alvez Marin (Chile) Universidad de Concepción Department of History and Philosophy of Law; 2010 & 2014 Workshop Participant

Team Members: Tatsuhiko Inatani (Japan) Kyoto University; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Marta Infantino (Italy) University of Trieste; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant

Description: The group will explore the critical potential of the comparative law field. Praised at the beginning of the 20th century for its potential to explore the globe’s legal diversity, comparative law now struggles to maintain that role in a much more interconnected and globalized world, where information about legal systems is more accessible, and the need for comparative research seems to be waning. Yet globalization has made comparative work and an understanding of legal pluralism ever more important. The group plans to re-examine classic issues of method:

  • What depth should our knowledge of legal systems go to, in order to allow us to draw sound comparative conclusions?
  • How might we distinguish serious comparative work from superficial or ‘touristic’ surveys?
  • What are the ideological agendas, if any, of comparative legal study?
  • How does comparative law intersect with conventional distinctions between national and international, public and private, substantive and procedural law?
  • How could comparative law move beyond comparison of official and state law to engage unofficial or customary legal arrangements?

The group aims to unearth the discipline’s capacity to probe into legal cultures for sources of their resistance to change, for their implicit judgments and assumptions about the usual way of doing things, and for the ways in which people’s identities and narratives are intertwined with their daily practices of law. In this respect, we rely on comparative law’s heterodox potential to expand the horizons of legal research, a potential that is yet to be explored.

 

Revolution, Constitutionalism and International Law

Team leader: Vidya Kumar (Canada) University of Birmingham Law School; 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2013 & 2014 IGLP Docent

Team members: Philip Kaisary (United Kingdom) University of Warwick School of Law; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Sanale Sibanda (South Africa) University of Witwatersrand Law School Commentator: Nathaniel Berman (United States) Brown University

Description: This project aims to explore the relationships among revolution, constitutionalism and international law, in both historical and contemporary contexts. By focusing on revolutions outside the global North, the team hopes to contribute to an alternative, critical and heterodox genealogy of constitutionalism. The relationship between emancipatory revolutionary projects and a drive to constitutionalize the results animates the group’s research concerns.

 

Varieties of State Capitalism and International Economic Order: China, Russia, Brazil and Beyond

Team Leader: Ming Du (People’s Republic of China) Lancaster University School of Law; 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant

Team Members: Swethaa Ballakrishnen (India) Stanford University; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Y-Vonne Hutchison (United States) La Isla Foundation; 2014 IGLP Workshop Participant; Yaraslau Kryvoi (Belarus) London School of Economics and Political Science; 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant; Nicolás Perrone (Italy) London School of Economics and Political Science; 2011 IGLP Workshop Participant, 2014 IGLP Docent

Description: State-owned and controlled enterprises control the commanding heights of the economy in state capitalist countries such as China, Russia and Brazil. The recent global financial crisis seems to have enhanced the appeal of state capitalism. State capitalism comes in a variety of forms, with different roles for state-owned enterprises, sovereign wealth funds, development banks and other actors. These actors take center stage in the global economy and pose challenges for the international economic order. This research project seeks to explore various models of state capitalism in context, and to explore the ways in which they have challenged the world trading and investment system. This research team hopes to shed fresh light on how to better integrate state capitalist countries into the rule-based global economic system. The group will use the June meeting to deepen their discussion, plan for a possible conference on varieties of state capitalism and international economic order in 2015 and plan for a series of articles and an edited book.

 


 

2012-2013 Travel Grants:

  • Marisa Taney (JD Candidate, Harvard Law School) received a grant to travel to Argentina to study immigration and asylum as a part of a continuing clinical project with the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic (HIRC). 
  • Damjan Kukovec (SJD, Slovenia) received a grant to travel to the London School of Economics to attend the conference Europe’s Justice Deficit? Beyond Good Governance and to present his paper Justice in the EU Constitutional and Free Movement Discourse and the European Periphery. 
  • Arnulf Becker (Brown University) received a travel grant to attend the conference on Religion, Empire and International Law in Zaragoza.
  • Saptarishi Bandopadhyay (Harvard Law School) received a travel grant to attend the 18th Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference on Reflective Law at the University of British Columbia.
  • Ching-Fu Lin (Harvard Law School) received a travel grant to present a paper entitled “Global Food Safety Governance: Regime Competition between Public and Private Regulatory Sites” at the Viterbo Global Administrative Seminar in Rome, Italy.
  • Jorge Gonzalez- Jacome (Harvard Law School) received a travel grant to present his paper entitled “The Struggle Against Constitutional Exceptions: Human Rights in Argentina, Chile, and Columbia During the 1980s” at the 2013 International Graduate Legal Research Conference at King’s College in London.

 

2010-2011 Travel Grants:

  • Namita Wahi (SJD, India) received a grant to travel to Pune, India in December to present her papers “From Promise to Progress: Citizens, Courts and the Right to Health in India” and “The Paradoxical Debate on Constitutional Property in India” at the Law and Social Science Network annual conference.
  • Jennifer Macleod (LL.M., United Kingdom) received a grant to travel to Ghana in January 2010 to research anti-eviction efforts in the Agyenmankata Community.
  • Lisa Collins (Kennedy and Frank Knox Visiting Researcher, United Kingdom) received a grant to travel to Ghana in January 2010 to research anti-eviction efforts in the Agyenmankata Community.
  • Iain Frame (S.J.D., Scotland) received a grant to travel to London in April 2010 to present a paper at the 4th International Graduate Legal Research Conference at King’s College London School of Law and Graduate School.
  • Heidi Matthews (S.J.D. Canada) received a grant to travel to Toronto in January to present a paper at The Third Annual Conference of the Toronto Group for the Study of International, Transnational, and Comparative Law
  • Jose Luis de la Calle Sanchez (IGLP Visiting Researcher, Spain) received a grant to attend a Conference on International Antitrust Litigation jointly organized by UCL Louvain and the Max Planck Institute in Hamburg, which was held in Brussels on March 26, 2010.

 

2009 Travel Grants:

  • Iain Frame (SJD – Scotland) received a grant to travel to Toronto, Ontario for the 2nd Annual Graduate Student Conference of the Toronto Group for the Study of International, Transnational, and Comparative Law, held in January, 2009. Iain presented his work dealing with the international law of money
  • Namita Wahi (SJD – India) received a grant to travel to New Delhi, India for the PRS Legislative Research Annual Conference held in December. Namita presented two papers at the conference – one on regulation of campaign finance in India and the other on devising a set of parameters for measuring the effectiveness of the legislature in a parliamentary system.
  • Heidi Matthews (SJD – Canada) received a grant to travel to Glasgow, Scotland for the Public in Law Conference held at the University of Glasgow in April. Heidi presented her paper “The Public in War: From Private to Public in International Law (and Back Again).”

 

2008 Travel Grants:

  • Arnulf Becker Lorca (SJD – Chile) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Arnulf presented his paper entitled “Universal International Law: histories of imposition, circulation and appropriation 1850s-1900s.”
  • Carlos Portugal Gouvêa (SJD Alum – Brazil) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Carlos presented his paper entitled “Beyond Formalization of Entitlements: Innovation in Land Redistribution in Latin America.”
  • Ermal Frashari (SJD – Albania) received a grant to travel to London for the School of Oriental and African Studies Post-Graduate Student Colloquium held in January, 2008. The colloquium provide a forum for doctoral students and others working in the fields of international, transnational and comparative law, to present their research for open discussion.
  • Hila Shamir (SJD – Israel) received a grant to travel to Toronto for the Up Against Family Law Exceptionalism Conference held at the University of Toronto in February, 2008. Hila participated in a round table discussion on “The Family, the Market and the State: Modes of ‘Public’ Ordering.”
  • Galit Sarfaty (HRP Visiting Fellow) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Galit gave a talk on “Why Culture Matters in International Institutions: The Marginality of Human Rights at the World Bank.”
  • Alvaro Santos (SJD Alum – Mexico) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Alvaro gave a talk on “Three discourses of Labor Law in the Development Debate.”
  • Vishaal Kishore (SJD – UK & Australia) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Vishaal chaired a panel on International Relations: Rethinking Established Paradigms. Vishaal also received a grant to travel to London for the School of Oriental and African Studies Post-Graduate Student Colloquium held in January, 2008. The colloquium provide a forum for doctoral students and others working in the fields of international, transnational and comparative law, to present their research for open discussion.
  • Hengameh Saberi (SJD – Iran) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Hengameh gave a talk on the Critique of Rational Choice Theories of International Relations.
  • Shunko Rojas (SJD – Argentina) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008. Shunko chaired a panel on Law and Development.
  • Lauren Coyle (JD Alum) received a grant to travel to Providence, Rhode Island for the The Watson Institute for International Studies Conference After Empire: Global Governance Today Conference, in June, 2008.

 

2007 Travel Grants:

  • Arnulf Becker Lorca (SJD – Chile) received a grant to travel to Oslo, Norway for the New International Law Conference, in March, 2007. Arnulf presented his paper entitled “International Lawyers at Ease with a Culterally, Politically, or Geographically Fragmented International Legal Order? Revisiting the Cosmopolitan Ideal in the History of Modern International Law.”
  • Moria Paz (SJD – Israel) received a grant to travel to Oslo, Norway for the New International Law Conference, in March, 2007. Moria presented her paper on “A Non-territorial Ethnic Network and the Evolution of State Power: The Case of the Alliance Israelite Universelle.”
  • Helena Alviar (SJD Alum – Columbia) received a grant travel to Harvard Law School for the “Up Against Family Law Exceptionalism” conference, in February 2007.
  • Stavros Gkantinis (SJD – Greece) received a grant to travel to Montreal for the European Union Studies Association Biennial International Conference, in May 2007.
  • Michael Halley (JD Alum) received a grant to travel to the United Kingdom for the BARS/NASSR Conference, in July, 2007.
  • Jeremy Perelman (SJD) received a grant to travel to Germany for the Law and Society Berlin Conference. His presentation focused on the theories and practices of social change advocacy in Africa
  • Shunko Rojas (SJD – Argentina) received a grant to travel to Berlin for the International Conference “Law and Society in the 21st Century: Transformations, Resistances, Futures” being held there from July 25th – 28th 2007.
  • Katherine Young (SJD – Australia) received a grant to travel to Germany for the Law and Society Berlin Conference. Katherine plans to present her paper “The Zakari Case: Using Rights as Footprints.”
  • Amalia Amaya (SJD – Spain) received a grant to travel Krakow, Poland for the conference “Law and Legal Culture in the 21st Century: Diversity and Unity” being held there from August 1st – 6th 2007. Amalia will prsent a paper at the conference’s workshop on “Reasoning about Legal Evidence.”